Another Silent Picture Show
another silent picture show
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nevver:

The sea of love, Javier Piñón
nevver:

The sea of love, Javier Piñón
nevver:

The sea of love, Javier Piñón
nevver:

The sea of love, Javier Piñón
nevver:

The sea of love, Javier Piñón
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"The whole culture is telling you to hurry, while the art tells you to take your time. Always listen to the art."
Junot Díaz  (via uzowuru)
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tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
tulumbeecool:

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

this is absolutely beautiful. 


Fascinating sights.
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soundsquixotic:

Heinrich Heidersberger
Selected images 1936/37 & 1968
soundsquixotic:

Heinrich Heidersberger
Selected images 1936/37 & 1968
soundsquixotic:

Heinrich Heidersberger
Selected images 1936/37 & 1968
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mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro
mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro
mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro
mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro
mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro
mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro
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inneroptics:

Philippe Halsman
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thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x]
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nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
nightmarekite:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 

can I just say how important it is to remember the tattooed ladies. This was in a time where the female body and female sexuality was still hugely repressed and looked down upon and these ladies were like “fuck that” and made their bodies into works of art and displayed them and dealt with the stigma related to being a tattooed lady with grace and bad-assery. They had so much more pressure on them to be good looking and so much more judgement passed on them by ‘polite’ society than tattooed men and they are just my heros ok?
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myheartwas-stolen:

Sleeping woman. Subway studies 1946
Stanley Kubrick